Both adults and children are finding CBD to help deal with the symptoms of ADD and ADHD.

Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorders are extremely common, affecting between 6% and 11% of U.S. children in America. The most common medical treatments for anxiety in the U.S. are the use of pharmaceutical drugs like stimulants (amphetamines), antihypertensive drugs, and cognition enhancing medications. However, it’s important to realize that these pharmaceutical drugs often have severe side effects and are not your only option for treatment.

In addition to self-care and therapy, you can incorporate CBD into your treatment regimen for natural, plant-based ADD/ADHD relief.

While we could always benefit from more research on CBD and ADHD, we turn the few medical studies that have been conducted over the past six years. These studies evaluated CBD’s medical efficacy in treating those who suffer from ADD and ADHD.

Study Results

A 2012 study looked at the effect of cannabidiol on rats treated with MK-801, a custom formula designed to mimic the effects of ADHD.

Results showed that the MK-801- (0.3 mg/kg) treated rats displayed reduced social investigative behavior, hyperactivity as well as reduced attention span. Pretreatment with the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (3 mg/kg) not only normalized social investigative behavior but increased it beyond control levels. Both cannabidiol and clozapine inhibited MK-801-induced hyperactivity.

A 2016 study randomly gave 30 adults with ADHD either a placebo or Sativex Oromucosal Spray, a cannabinoid medication containing a 1:1 ratio of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to cannabidiol (CBD). In the intention to treat analysis, Sativex treatment was associated with a nominally significant improvement in hyperactivity/impulsivity and a trend for improvement in inattention. There were further indications for improvement in activity and cognitive performance, and emotional liability.

In another 2016 study, clinical and anecdotal evidence suggest an increasingly popular perception that cannabis is therapeutic for ADHD, including via online resources. Given that the Internet is increasingly utilized as a source of healthcare information and may influence perceptions, [a 2016 study] conducted a qualitative analysis of online forum discussions, also referred to as threads, on the effects of cannabis on ADHD to systematically characterize the content patients and caregivers may encounter about ADHD and cannabis.”

Twenty-five (25%) percent of individual posts indicated that cannabis is therapeutic for ADHD, as opposed to 8% that it is harmful, 5% that it is both therapeutic and harmful, and 2% that it has no effect on ADHD. This pattern was generally consistent when the year of each post was considered. The greater endorsement of therapeutic versus harmful effects of cannabis did not generalize to mood, other (non-ADHD) psychiatric conditions, or overall domains of daily life. Additional themes emerged (e.g., cannabis being considered sanctioned by healthcare providers).

As indicated by the studies above, CBD helps reduce hyperactivity and improve mental cognition in patients suffering from ADD/ADHD.

Studies

Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). (2018, September 21). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/data.html

Gururajan, A., Taylor, D. A., & Malone, D. T. (2012, October). Cannabidiol and clozapine reverse MK-801-induced deficits in social interaction and hyperactivity in Sprague-Dawley rats. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495620

Cooper, R., Williams, E., Seegobin, S., Tye, C., Kuntsi, J., & Asherson, P. (2016, October). Cannabinoids in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A randomised controlled trial. Retrieved from
https://www.europeanneuropsychopharmacology.com/article/S0924-977X(16)30912-9/pdf

Mitchell, J. T., Sweitzer, M. M., Tunno, A. M., Kollins, S. H., & McClernon, F. J. (2016, May 26). “I Use Weed for My ADHD”: A Qualitative Analysis of Online Forum Discussions on Cannabis Use and ADHD. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27227537